St. Pennybags - The patron saint of games

St. Pennybags is the 'old man' character from the game Monopoly, often called Rich Uncle Penny Bags, he essentially was the main character I thought of when doing the piece, which was for the entry to the Illustrators Assoc. 9x5 exhibition 'Playtime'. The latin translation which is shown as Sanctus Dives Patruus Denarium Sacculos - Holy Rich Uncle Money Bags is depicted subtly on the edges. So the idea was to combine all the old games visually into an old greek icon style theme. The parody was to have a some fun and in away and make him the 'king' of games - someone to pray to, when your losing your game! The games represented are obviously Monopoly, Trivial Pursuit, Darts, Snakes & Ladders, Backgammon, Chess, Scrabble & Cards (Dice). I left Checkers as being more symbolic in the circle of Trivial Pursuit & Darts, as I didn't want to over load the image. The working process is shown below and the final image is here.

Initial rough and colours.


Initial rough and colours.

Tracing the design onto the board.


Tracing the design onto the board.

Initial laying down of colour after underpainting.


Initial laying down of colour after underpainting.

Applying the gouache.


Applying the gouache.

Waterlow and Sons Book Press Restoration

A recently completed cast iron Book Press restoration which took a couple of months to complete, but will surely help in the near future. The press was picked up on eBay many years ago and was made by Waterlow and Sons Limited in England. They were a major worldwide engraver of currency, postage stamps, stocks and bond certificates based in London, Watford and Dunstable in England. The company was founded as a family business in 1810 and was acquired in 1961 by De La Rue. But still unsure as to the exact year it was made.

Stage 1
This process was removing all the brass fittings and grinding of old paint and rust.

Stage 2
Masking the brass and priming the iron.

Stage 3
As you can see, part of the inner handle was damaged, I attempted to make a wax mold, but it didn't take. The next stage I created my own mini forge and melt some brass to pour into recess, but this too didn't take! In the end I took the damaged part to Bill at Perrin Sculpture Foundry and he repaired it perfectly (see first image or stage 6).

Stage 4
This is the first coat of gloss black, an additional five coats were applied, with sanding in between each coat.

Stage 5
Before assembly, a clear coat of lacquer was applied (thanks to Rob Snook from Snook & Company Antique Dealers).

Stage 6
Final Assembly.